Digital Literacy 2015 Trends Revisited — A Use of Digital Tools for High School Seniors

Hello all:
I am revisiting an entry posted at the beginning of this year on digital literacy trends. See https://digitalliteracyvine.wordpress.com/2015/01/17/digital-literacy-trends-for-2015-quick-thoughts/

I discussed digital literacy with regard to educational issues, job skills, and going green.
I thought to extend the post by suggesting ways that high school seniors can professionally use cyberspace to their advantage. One social media tool is LinkedIn. LinkedIn is touted as the world’s largest professional network.

Yes we know many teenagers use digital tools  to be on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Consider suggesting that the high school seniors in your life begin to build a professional electronic/cyberspace presence on LinkedIn.

Once signed up they can use the website to:
practice writing and uploading a resume,
practice building their communication skills by reaching out to peers in a professional manner, (They could also connect with college personnel or college freshman if they are about to be a college student.)
 learn of the professional opportunities and professional associations that are posted through LinkedIn.

Look to get the high school seniors in your life to jumpstart their professional career. There’s no sense in letting those digital tools be used just for entertainment!

Do share your thoughts.

Visual Literacy: Now You See It — What Does It Mean? (Part 2)

Recently a colleague* did a short photo shoot of me and I used the pictures for my YouTube Channel. (Go to https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCG-afzk4ZZbNGuTbpHRR5cw.)
I thought it would be a good image to use when talking about visual literacy**.  Pretend you have a youngster nearby or go and get a real one and discuss the collage.
How would you

How would you “think through” these images?

During the discussion of visual literacy, here are a few questions I’d ask:
1. What does it look she’s doing?
2. Does she look happy, sad, confused, excited, or peaceful?
3. How do you feel as you look at the images?
4. Why might she be the only one in the images?

Here’s an extension  project — have the child draw his own picture collage and write a story about it. See if you can take a picture and post it on your favorite social media site or have the child send it to a friend or relative. (You ‘ll cover in art, writing, and the use of digital tools all in one sweep!)

Share your experience!

* Thanks to Mary Marques for the photos.
** For extensive reading about visual literacy see the document at http://www.iste.org/docs/excerpts/medlit-excerpt.pdf

Ed’s View: Digital Literacy and the Illustrated Story Creation

In attempting to carve my niche into the writing market through — the illustrated story– I’ve had some challenges.

In designing this story format which is enhanced with graphic art,  pictures, then one combines storyboard art throughout,  this is only accomplished through modern-day digital technology and a good dose of digital literacy.

Since digital literacy is thought to be the ability to use and possess a basic understanding of networked devices (smartphones, tablets, software applications connected to the internet) creating the illustrated story is impossible without it.

I have been able as a digital immigrant to learn the skills necessary to create my first illustrated story. Thus far, I have learned to move the story creation  seamlessly between the editor and artist through smartphone, tablets, or PC’s. This movement allows  me and others involved in the project to work on the story by adding onto or refining our work.

What I have not learned, as a digital immigrant, to do well is  social media marketing. Yes, I use Facebook and LinkedIn,  but my comfort level is low.  I still have the need to see a person’s facial expressions as we converse. And no, an emoticon at the end of the sentence doesn’t make up for seeing the person’s expressions.

What’s a guy to do? Keep plugging away at it. Keep up with me as I write here again and do see my illustrated story through the link below.

http://www.amazon.com/T-H-E-Team-Begins-Mission-Saga/dp/0692248005/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1407473632&sr=8-1&keywords=T.+H.+E.+Begins

Signing off,
Ed

Edward Carter has more than 10 years’ consulting experience for an investment bank firm on Wall Street. He has an MBA with additional degrees in management and technology. He has sat on the board of directors for two technology start-up companies. He is now breaking into the arena of writing illustrated stories.

 

Metacognition: How is Your Thinking Working For You?

https://i0.wp.com/mcdn1.teacherspayteachers.com/thumbitem/Metacognition-Salad-Mini-Poster-042576500-1370733400/original-721999-1.jpgPicture taken from http://mcdn1.teacherspayteachers.com/thumbitem/Metacognition-Salad-Mini-Poster-042576500-1370733400/original-721999-1.jpg

The easiest definition that I know of regarding metacognition is that it is “thinking about your thinking. ”

The late Dr. Michael E. Martinez refined the definition to be “the monitoring and control of thought”. See his full paper at  http://www.gse.uci.edu/person/martinez_m/docs/mmartinez_metacognition.pdf

If you have never heard of the word “metacognition” you are probably:
1. pronouncing the word over and over,
2. thinking about the concept,
3. analyzing  what you have read about the word,
4. trying to attach its meaning to some other concept you know from the past,
5. reviewing your thoughts until you are sure you understand the word!

Congratulations: you are practicing metacognitive strategies and thinking about how you think and even how you learn.

To be digitally literate,  yes, you need to use the electronic devices and software programs to find your information. Yet, once you find your information, you also need to interpret what you see and know if you are learning from the information you find.

So… digital natives and digital immigrants how’s your thinking working out for you?

Do share your thoughts!

 

 

Dot. The Digital Tools Girl!

Check out Dot, the  girl who knows how to use digital tools

Check out Dot, the girl who knows how to use digital tools

Hello all:
Here’s a children’s book regarding digital tools for you to enjoy.
Dot. by Randi Zuckerberg. She knows how to use digital tools. She can tap, text, swipe, share, and talk. She stops doing all of that indoors to do all those same activities outdoors with her friends. What fun!

Technology Petting Zoos: Visit One Today!

Are you trying to learn how to use digital tools, but you feel stumped? Often, your local or regional library will have a program, a space where you can practice using a cell phone, a tablet, or an e-reader. They call such spaces “technology petting zoos”. Find a technology petting zoo near you and get your practice in today!